Newsom signs law making abortions cheaper in California

governor of california Gavin NewsomGavin NewsomBalance/Sustainability – Space-grown lettuce could block bone loss on Mars California announces water agency supply cuts amid third year of drought After two long years, it’s more it’s time to end Newsom’s emergency powers MORE (D) signed a new law on Tuesday that will make abortions cheaper for people with private insurance plans.

The Abortion Accessibility Act (SB 245), proposed by State Senator Lena A. Gonzalez (D), will eliminate out-of-pocket fees for abortion services.

“As states across the country attempt to set us back by restricting basic reproductive rights, California continues to protect and advance reproductive freedom for all,” Newsom said in a press release. “With this legislation, we will help ensure equitable and affordable access to abortion services so that out-of-pocket costs do not prevent receiving care.”

The new law prohibits health plans and insurers from imposing copayments, deductibles, or other cost-sharing requirements for abortion and abortion-related services. It will also prevent them from imposing practices for managing the use of covered abortion and abortion-related services.

California is one of six states that require health insurance plans to cover abortion services. However, disbursements for patients can exceed $1,000, the press release notes.

The move comes amid a Supreme Court debate over the overturning of Reo v. Wade, the 1973 ruling that prohibited states from banning abortion.

The law also follows a controversial Texas law passed last year that allows private citizens to sue anyone who performs, aids or abets an abortion after fetal heart activity is detected, usually after six weeks. Earlier this month, the Texas Supreme Court also ruled against the abortion providers’ latest challenge.

Oklahoma is one of the most recent states to take action against abortion, passing a bill that would amount to a near-total ban on abortions in the state if it becomes law.



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